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How to Criticize Your Child
(Family)
By: Anthony Kane, MD

We have an obligation to teach our children how to conduct themselves properly in the world. Part of this duty requires us to correct their mistakes in behavior. One of the ways we do this is through giving our children constructive criticism.


First we need to stress that to give this criticism to our children is an option, it is an obligation. As parents we have a duty to redirect our children. It is not in our childrenís best interests nor do we do them any favors if we do not guide them properly. When we see things that come up in their daily lives that they do wrong, we must correct this behave. How can we as parents redirect our childrenís behavior in such a way that it does not get in the way of the healthy parent child relationship?

How to Give Criticism Constructively


There are a number of things we should remember when redirecting our children that will make our criticism more accepted and more effective.

1- Children Have Feelings



This is probably the most important thing to remember when criticizing our children.
It is obvious to everyone that children have feelings. Yet very often it is something that we as parents forget.

Children, particularly when they are small, are completely in our control. It is easy to forget that they are little people. They have feelings that can be hurt and self-esteem that can be crushed if we criticize them in a non-constructive belittling way. We must try to relate to them as we would like others to relate to us.

2- Have Your Message Clear


The goal of proper criticism is to get your message across to your child. That means you have to have a message. If you donít have an idea you are trying to convey, then all you are doing by criticizing your child is venting your own anger and frustration. You will do nothing positive for your child, and your child will not change his behavior in the future. Remember, your goal with criticism is to educate, not to punish or embarrass or to seek revenge against the child. When you criticize you must have something you are trying to teach.

3- Deliver Your Message Properly


You must give rebuke. It is your obligation as a parent. You have an obligation to raise your child properly. The point is that it should be given in a positive manner. To do this you must satisfy a number of conditions.

a. Criticize the behavior not your child


This is critical. Direct your criticism toward your childís behavior. It has to be clear to your child that it is the behavior that upsets you, not him.

b. Donít label your child


Children get their sense of whom they are from what others tell them. When a parent gives a child a label, this label will eventually stick, with sometimes disastrous consequences.

c. Give your rebuke privately


It will be hard enough on your child to have to bear your criticism. You should do everything you can to spare him the embarrassment of having you rebuke him in front of others.

d. Donít dwell upon the past


The only valid criticism is for the future. What the child did is over. You should acknowledge the mistake but make it clear that the reason you are speaking to your child is so that he can improve in the future.

4- Offer an Opportunity to Correct the Wrong


Your child has to know what he did was wrong. He should also be given the opportunity to redeem himself by correcting his mistake. You should have suggestions how the child can correct the wrong. This will give your child the message that he canít hurt others and just walk away. He must say heís sorry or do the victim a favor. It gives him a chance to take responsibility for his actions. It also allows him to put the misdeed behind him and go on.

5- Deliver the Criticism with Love


This is vital. Criticism is a gift. It is a gift of knowledge, it is a gift of values. But it is an unwanted gift. Still, it is a gift nevertheless. No one wants to hear criticism. Our goal when we give criticism is to do it as painlessly as possible so it will be received properly.

It must be clear when you deliver your message that you are doing it for your childís sake. If your child knows that what you are saying is because you love him, the message will be better received.

If you are angry, all the child will hear is the anger. What the child will hear is ďYou donít like me.Ē Nothing else will be heard. You must make it clear to your child that you are criticizing because you care about him. You cannot let the message get blurred out by the static of your emotions.

This is not easy. It is easy to write about it and to read this when no one is around and things are calm. It is much harder to apply this idea when there is a tumult going on and the tensions are high. Still we have to acknowledge at least the proper way to do things. Or else we will never be successful.

6- Try to See Your Childís Point of View


We as parents are not faced with the same challenges as our children. This leads to a very reasonable response, at least in the mind of the child, to think, ďWho are you to criticize me? How do you know what I am going through? You donít understand me.Ē

This is a legitimate response. Your child doesnít see you as a former child. Your child sees you as a stable adult. Now, you may understand your child perfectly, but your child doesnít know that. It helps when you give criticism to visualize things from your childís perspective and couch your words is such a way that your child knows clearly you understand him.

7- Sometimes it is Better to Delay the Criticism


We have a knee jerk reaction to respond immediately when we see our children do something that we donít like. This is a normal reaction. However, you should always try to think if this is the best time and place to rebuke your child.

When your child does something wrong he will be expecting the criticism right away. When the child is expecting the reaction, his guard is up he will react by defending himself and fighting back. He will not hear what you say and he will be defending himself.

Sometimes it is better to wait until things quiet down. Then you can discuss with the child rationally and the child will hear it. You will also be calmer and be able to deliver a better message to your child.

8- Sometimes no Criticism is the Best


The purpose of criticism is to correct future behavior. If it is clear to the child that he did something wrong and if the child feels bad about what was done and he is not likely to repeat it, there is nothing added by acknowledging his misdeed.

Conclusion


I want to point out that the principals that we have discussed apply when you need to rebuke anybody. The difference is that for anyone else we usually can choose whether or not to get involved. As a parent we do not have that option. We are automatically involved.

We have an obligation to correct our childrenís behavior. Our children need our guidance. It is a terrible example when parents let their children do what they want without direction. The children may act like they like the freedom, but these are the children who grow up not knowing right from wrong and not realizing that there are consequences for bad actions. Eventually these children feel that their parents really donít care about them. Often they are right.



It is hard to be a parent. But the more effort you put into steering your child on the proper path to adulthood, the more happiness you will have when you share in your childís successes through his life.



This article was posted on Aug 23, 2005

About The Author
Anthony Kane, MD



Anthony Kane, MD ADD ADHD Advances Anthony Kane, MD is a physician, an international lecturer, and director of special education. He is the author of a book, numerous articles, and a number of online programs dealing with ADHD treatment, ODD, child behavior issues, and education. You may visit his website, ADD ADHD Advances, and sign up for the ADD ADHD Advances online journal.


                                 Other Articles By Anthony Kane, MD


   

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